How Can They Replace A Sewer Line Without Digging A Trench?

In order to fix a pipe located far below ground, one would have to dig up the pipe, right? Not necessarily! As it turns out, the process is simpler than it might seem. There is a newer and more advanced sewer line replacement or repair procedure called "trenchless sewer repair," and the great thing about it is that it won't leave a big ditch in your yard. Most homes are candidates for this type of repair. Here are the major steps your sewer company will follow.

Step 1: Making a Hole

Your sewer repair experts will start by digging one hole straight down, above the sewer pipe. When they reach the pipe, they will make a hole in it. This hole will be a couple of inches in diameter. The hole dug in your soil will only be about a foot wide, so it will cause minimal damage to the landscaping. There's also some flexibility as to where it is placed. If one location would interfere with a tree, then the hole can be made a little further down the pipe.

Step 2: Inspecting the Pipe Via Video

Once the hole has been made, your sewer repair team will send a camera down into the pipe. The camera will capture footage of the inside of the pipe, showing the extent of the damage. This way, the contractors will know how far down they need to go to continue the repairs.

Step 3: Inserting the Sleeve

After the damage has been assessed, the contractors will feed a sleeve, made from epoxy, carefully down into the pipe. This sleeve will extend a little way past the damaged portion of the pipe.

Step 4: Inflating the Sleeve

Once the sleeve is passed down through the pipe, the sewer repair team will use a special device to basically pump air down inside the sleeve, putting pressure on it. This will push the sleeve against the walls of the pipe. Now, when water and waste flow down the pipe, they will flow inside this sleeve, which will keep anything from leaking out. Basically, you have a new pipe inside the old pipe, and all without your contractors having to remove any of the old pipe.

As you can see, trenchless sewer repair really is not all that complicated. If you need a new sewer pipe and don't want a giant ditch in your yard, it really is your best bet.

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